WHS: Documents

Special thanks goes to John Amerine and his late wife Angela for preserving the proceeding documents. It is published here with explicit permission from and full credit to John and Angela Amerine.


History of Waverly Hills Sanatorium


Dr. A. B. Mullen. Image from the Courier-Journal, 20 August 1942, p. 11.

The following is a comprehensive history of the Waverly Hills Sanatorium with handwritten notes from the Medical Director, Dr. Alvin B. Mullen. Dr. Mullen, a native of Louisville, attended the University of Louisville School of Medicine and, after completing a one year internship in Pittsburgh, PA, he returned to Louisville and the Waverly Hills Sanatorium where his family remained in Jeffersonville. Dr. Mullen joined Waverly Hills in 1926 and was commissioned as a Major in the United States military during the Second World War. Dr. Mullen spent the bulk of his career treating tubercular patients until his retirement. After Waverly Hills closed in 1961, Dr. Mullen continued his work as director of the tuberculosis clinical operations for the Louisville-Jefferson County Health Department until his retirement in 1972. Dr. Mullen died in 1993.



How Waverly Hills Got Its Name


Contributed by Phil Tkacz & Shawn Logan | contact@kyhi.org

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