The 1918 “Spanish” Influenza Pandemic

Quick Facts About Kentucky and the Spanish Influenza Pandemic Approximately 13,000-14,000 Kentuckians were casualties of the first and second waves of the pandemic. October 1-3, 1918: ambulances at General Hospital (Louisville) were working 24 hours a day picking up sick and febrile patients with fevers exceeding 103 degrees Fahrenheit. October 4, 1918: the isolation ward…

Medical Supplies in Early 20th-Century Hospitals

Hospitals are an incredibly important part of every community in the United States. From acute-care hospitals to psychiatric and long-term care facilities, these institutions provide a life-saving service. In order for these places to save lives, they have to be well supplied. From bandages to highly complex machines, these items have proven to be the…

Dr. Stanley G. Bandeen and the Bush-Bandeen Sanatorium

In the late 1920s, Louisville osteopathic physician Dr. Evelyn Bush realized her dream of opening a sanatorium at 1435 South Fourth Street. The very spacious house would allow patients to stay and convalesce while they were being treated. Soon after, Dr. Bush extended an invitation to a fellow Louisville osteopathic physician, Dr. Stanley G. Bandeen….

Forgotten Kentucky Medical Colleges

Be sure to check our Medical Colleges page for more detailed listings. Hospital College of Medicine Louisville, Kentucky Population of Louisville in the early 1880s: 123,758 The Hospital College of Medicine was established in 1873. The first class was graduate in 1875. Classes were graduated each subsequent year. The faculty included eight professors and one…

The Strange Case of Dr. Abner Baker, Jr.

It was a chilly morning on the 3rd of October. Dr. Abner Baker, Jr. rode through a crowd of people in a calm and stoic manner. As the wagon came to a stop, Dr. Baker stepped down and quietly made his way up the steps of the wooden gallows. At his perch upon the gallows,…

Louisville’s 1902 Morgue Scandal

In 1894 the Board of Public Safety and Kentucky legislature passed sweeping changes to Kentucky’s laws regarding the morgue in Louisville, Kentucky and unclaimed bodies. The former held that the morgue shall be in charge of the janitor at the University of Louisville and shall be open at all hours of the day and night…

Medicine Between 1851-1951

Check out the 1910 Abraham Flexner Report from the Carnegie Foundation here. 1851 marked a formative year for Kentucky medicine when the Kentucky Medical Association was established. Within this period, rapid changes and developments occurred which advanced the field of medicine to a level never seen, or thought of, before. Rudolf Virchow, a specialist in…

Kentucky’s Forgotten Private Institutions

This is a very brief visual look at some of Kentucky’s long-forgotten private hospitals, institutions, and sanitariums. Many of these institutions changed ownership and names and therefore some of these are the same buildings just with different names and owners. Note: we will keep this post updated as we continue to find new additions. (The…

The Hill-Burton Act and its Impact on Kentucky

In 1946, the United States Congress passed a new law that afforded hospitals and other healthcare facilities to apply for grants and funding to construct new facilities and/or modernize existing ones. The hospitals would, in return, provide service to the local citizens of which the facility served at little or no cost. Essentially, those who…